Matching Articles"Society" (Total 35)

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  • With the construction of the railway, workers began to leave their coastal homes to find employment at new mines and mills in the island's interior.
  • Much of our knowledge of daily life in outport Newfoundland in the late 18th and early 19th century comes from the pens of visitors. They were typically missionaries, explorers, naturalists, and geologists whose work brought them to outlying communities not often visited by outsiders or even the local government.
  • Considerable uncertainty surrounds our understanding of daily life in Newfoundland during the late 18th and early 19th centuries.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador experienced immigration during the first half of the 19th century and emigration during the latter decades of the century.
  • About the origins of the town of Stephenville and it's surrounding area, once known as the Acadian Village.
  • The island of Newfoundland has a long and indented coastline that includes several major bays.
  • A histroy about the communities Broomclose and Sailors Island, located on the Eastport Peninsula of Newfoundland.
  • Information about the definition of a city as well as information about St. John's, Mount Pearl, and Corner Brook.
  • The settlement of Eastport, Happy Adventure and Sandy Cove was essentially a single phased operation from the 1850s into the 1870s.
  • The origins of Communities in the Eastport Peninsula, such as Salvage, Eastport, Sandy Cove, Happy Adventure, etc.
  • A community is a group of people who live in the same area and share the same culture. This article is all about the function of communities.
  • Information about the communities of Burnside and St. Chad's on the Eastport Peninsula of Newfoundland.
  • The Neck, a parcel of land used for inter-community and peninsular activities, is located between Eastport, Happy Adventure, and Sandy Cove.
  • About the English and Irish origins of Newfoundlanders and Labradorians that immigrated between the 17th and 19th century.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador is often described as having the most homogeneous population of European origin in Canada.
  • A permanent population in the Salvage-Barrow Harbour area from the 1780s up to the 1820s was created by families who came to fish for cod.
  • Families of Salvage were very closely intertwined through marriage and migration with those in nearby places.
  • Settled in the 1820s, Flat Islands (a collective name for a cluster of four flat-topped island settlements) grew very rapidly
  • French migrations to Newfoundland and Labrador began in the early 16th century and lasted for approximately 400 years.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador's cod fishery was the major pull factor attracting French settlers to the colony from the 16th through 19th centuries.