Matching Articles"Economy" (Total 94)

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  • The labour force of Newfoundland and Labrador is now more highly diversified than is usually realized.
  • about the men and women, such as Naomi Gregory, who came from Newfoundland outports to St. John's to work in domestic service in upper class homes.
  • Although it is often described in different terms, the expedition that led to the discovery of Newfoundland was primarily an economic enterprise.
  • At the time of Confederation in 1949 slightly over half of the province's population used electricity.
  • Hamilton River was one of Newfoundland and Labrador's largest hydro electric projects.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador's physical environment greatly influenced the ways settlers made a living during the 19th century. The richness of marine resources encouraged a pattern of coastal settlement and made the cod and seal fisheries central to local economies. In contrast, the relative scarcity of good soils and other terrestrial resources made large-scale farming operations impractical and discouraged year-round habitation of interior spaces.
  • Decades of overfishing in Newfoundland and Labrador during the 1990s caused the northern cod stocks to collapse and resulted in a moratorium
  • European fishers had been working off Newfoundland and Labrador's coasts for about 100 years by the turn of the 17th century.
  • The rise of the industrial, frozen fish sector did not solve all the problems of the fishery, as many had hoped.
  • As fishing technology became more complex and efficient during the 20th century, it changed Newfoundland and Labrador's fishing industry
  • Throughout the nineteenth century, Newfoundland and Labrador's economy centred on its ability to export goods to foreign buyers.
  • It became advantageous for Great Britain to have a fishery based in Newfoundland as conditions of market and competition changed.
  • Forest industries contribute much to the Newfoundland and Labrador economy.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador's forests are a renewable resource, so long as they are harvested in a sustainable way.
  • The island of Newfoundland contains 15 million acres of forest, of which more than nine million acres are considered productive.
  • In 1939, Newfoundland produced 1.5 million pounds of frozen groundfish. With the outbreak of World War II, however, the industry took off.
  • The years between 1940 and 1969 saw dramatic changes in the Newfoundland fishery.
  • Almost from the beginning of the rise of the frozen fish industry in the early 1940s, the government began to offer assistance.
  • The origin of what is today referred to as traditional society in Newfoundland and Labrador may be traced to a way of life that developed around the inshore fishery in the late 19th century outport.
  • Hydro-electricity has played an important role in the industrial development of Newfoundland and Labrador.