Matching Articles"Economy" (Total 26)

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  • The arts industry in Newfoundland and Labrador provides the province's people with a heightened quality of life while at the same time contributing to the local economy.
  • On 10 December 1894, two of Newfoundland and Labrador's three banks closed their doors and never opened them again.
  • After the Commercial and Union Banks ceased operations, Newfoundland and Labrador entered a period of economic, social, and political chaos.
  • A brief history of colas plant in Clarenville, Newfoundland, and of Terence O'Meara who oversaw its construction.
  • The labour force of Newfoundland and Labrador is now more highly diversified than is usually realized.
  • about the men and women, such as Naomi Gregory, who came from Newfoundland outports to St. John's to work in domestic service in upper class homes.
  • Although it is often described in different terms, the expedition that led to the discovery of Newfoundland was primarily an economic enterprise.
  • Hamilton River was one of Newfoundland and Labrador's largest hydro electric projects.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador's physical environment greatly influenced the ways settlers made a living during the 19th century. The richness of marine resources encouraged a pattern of coastal settlement and made the cod and seal fisheries central to local economies. In contrast, the relative scarcity of good soils and other terrestrial resources made large-scale farming operations impractical and discouraged year-round habitation of interior spaces.
  • The origin of what is today referred to as traditional society in Newfoundland and Labrador may be traced to a way of life that developed around the inshore fishery in the late 19th century outport.
  • Newfoundland's tourism industry dates back to the 1890s, when advances in rail and ocean transportation made the colony more accessible than before.
  • For the first three hundred years after European settlement, the economy of Newfoundland and Labrador depended almost solely on the fisheries
  • An informal economy is one in which people provide for their own needs by engaging in a variety of noncommercial activities
  • Most accounts of work and labour are incomplete, since most historical records do not recognize work outside the exchanges of the market.
  • Government officials promoted various land-based industries during the first half of the 20th century.
  • The fishery closure ended almost 500 years of fishing activity in Newfoundland and Labrador, where it put about 30,000 people out of work.
  • The Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815) were a time of social upheaval in Europe, but brought economic prosperity to Newfoundland and Labrador.
  • The Railway Settlement Act and the Newfoundland Government Railway (1920-49)--Society--Newfoundland and Labrador Heritage Web
  • Newfoundland and Labrador's offshore oil industry has made significant contributions to the provincial economy in recent decades.
  • Following the 1992 cod moratorium, Newfoundland and Labrador's fishing industry shifted from a groundfishery to a shellfishery.